Article – Oscars 2020 Predictions

TL;DR – This is a list of not what we think will actually win in today’s 2020 Academy Awards, but who we would give the awards to if we could

Article –

It is Oscars time again, and for the first time in a long time I can’t watch the ceremony live, but that does not mean I can’t enjoy the vicariously through the form of an article. So here we will be going through all the nominees and picking which ones we would have picked if we were a voting member of the academy.

Now, I should preface this with the notice that we have not seen every film nominated, so we will only be picking form those we have seen. To be fair, we will only be covering the categories where we have seen at least three of the nominees.  Also, if you would like to see our reviews for said films you can clink on the links to be taken to them. So with out any further prattling on here are the nominees.

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Nominees:

1917
Knives Out
Marriage Story
Once upon a Time … in Hollywood
Parasite

Parasite (Gisaengchung, 기생충). Image Credit: Madman Films.

I actually quite liked all the nominees in this category, even the films that didn’t quite grab me like Once in Hollywood and Marriage Story you could tell was still well written. However, I think one did just make it out on top and that has to be Bong Joon-ho & Han Jin-won exploration of class and wealth in modern South Korea.

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Movie Review – Little Women (2020)

TL;DR – I highly recommend this astounding film    

Score – 5 out of 5 stars

Post-Credit Scene – There is no post-credit scene

Little Women. Image Credit: Sony.

Review

It has been a long time since I have had a good cry in the cinemas, and I don’t mean a good one solitary tear gallantly making its way down the side of my face as the music soars around. No I mean some good old fashioned weeping, the kind that makes you wish you had brought a hankie or at least some tissues as you try to compose yourself after as you thank God that you were not wearing any mascara because there would be no coming back from that. Well, today we look at a film that is all that and more. 

So to set the scene, we open in New York City back in 1868 where Josephine “Jo” March (Saoirse Ronan) works as a teacher in a boarding house as she tries to be published as a writer. The publisher Mr Dashwood (Tracy Letts) is interested in her work, but it needed to be more salacious and the female characters must end the book either married or dead. In France, Jo’s sister Amy (Florence Pugh) is enjoying some time painting and finding a husband under the guidance of her Aunt (Meryl Streep) when she spies Theodore “Laurie” Laurence (Timothée Chalamet) a childhood friend of her and her sisters Meg (Emma Watson) and Beth (Eliza Scanlen), as well as the former suiter of Jo, in the gardens of Paris. It is a moment of joy, but there and across the Atlantic, there is a cloud on the horizon because the past is not going to stay in the past.

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